Knowledge Innovation

Unbound Spiral: Metalayers

February 24, 2003 03:30 PM

Marc Canter made a great post late yesterday ""I've fallen in love with Fotolog"" He too sees magic in connecting up human profiles with human faces and illustrates his points with Ryze, Live Journal, and more. I'm still wondering whether I really understand his paradigm. How far will it go? With all this sharing could e-mail just go away? Will you come to me rather than me "sending to you"? Is our digital sharing about to take on new meaning? See Marc's comments and then refer to Metalayer quoted below.

Marc's Voice If we could imagine a) a way of encrypting and securing profiles so that one could be compatible with something like the Liberty Alliance standard, while at the same time control their own identity profile = that's what PingID is.
And b) if you could imagine all of these identity systems interlocking between each other - enabling Ryze, Fotolog or LiveJournal users - to access and add each other as friends of one another - that's what we're hoping to do with the open People server idea - I floated. Hopefully this is what we'll get Ascio to put into open source.

People At the core of everything are people, their profiles and their lists of friends, family and colleagues who they want to interact with. These lists are known as 'buddy lists' today - but we think that notion will expand, so we call them 'private clouds'.

Similtaneously, with activities here I've been on a Metalayer site. At first it is almost counter intuitive. Here's a short piece from their materials:

"...... eMail, though very powerful, will not be the system we will use in the future to manage our relationships and some years from now, we will understand, that eMail was just an intermediate step in the virtual revolution. Metalayer can see a second revolution in virtual communication happening, a revolution that moves relationship management out of the inboxes into contextualized private and public places on the web. The revolution that will create virtual identities and communities in cyberspace."