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October 2002 Archives

October 19, 2002

Poptech

This posting is the result of watching Poptech, finding the following blog and then subscribing to it.  That added it to my news list (which will need some editing).  Next step will be to add some navigation bars..... The post and comment....

Total Immersion in Virtual Reality and Virtual Worlds - this afternoon's program features Jordan Pollack and Bruce Damer, and apparently it's show and tell time.  Pollack shows us a gangly robot that was evolved from software trying to create something.   Damer showed us a virtual world program with weird heads that were actually controlled by real people.  I lack the skills to even attempt to explain what is happening during this session.  

[Ernest Svenson: Poptech 2002

Joe's piece raised great quesitons about Intellectual Property and Artificial Intelligence.  Clearly we need to think more about how the artificial world thinks about property.  For what are the implications when a world of replicators (like star trek) can simply pull information out of an "object"?

October 23, 2002

KM Blogs

The following post reflects why I too think there are great possiblities for KM Blogs..

Making group-forming ridiculously easy.

Weblogs have a potential for group-forming like no other medium. However I'm convinced that much of it to this day remains untapped. I'd like to explain an idea that I have been bouncing around for a while. It might well be a reformulation of what others have said previously. I believe that implementing this properly would give a nice boost to the blogosphere's social aggregation capability.

Basically the goal is to push the threshold for group creation to an unprecedented low. I think Reed's Law should be refined to state:

The value of a group-forming network increases exponentially with the number of people in the network, and in inverse proportion to the effort required to start a group.

Here's a sample motivating scenario. Not long ago I wrote an item on professions in the blogosphere. The post caught the interest of other bloggers. A few replies came here and there. If you search diligently enough you'll find them, but it's not easy. Presumably, those who have taken part in the discussion would like to hear about it if the topic comes up again, but currently this will only happen by chance. This kind of situation is very common.

[Charles Nadeau: Knowledge management]

October 24, 2002

First Entry

This records when I started using MoveableType as my blogging tool. I've since added some historical entries. I know they mess up the archives, and while I look forward, it is also useful to flesh out the journey.

My Experiment

This is my second posting to my moveable type weblog. I'm going to cut and past from my Radio Userland site and see what happens with content. Have to get a few pages filling and a few posts to really see what is happening. This post was from yesterday... Just looked at the preview. It is not picking up the url links... http://radio.weblogs.com/0114925/

The following post reflects why I too think there are great possiblities for KM Blogs..

Making group-forming ridiculously easy.

Weblogs have a potential for group-forming like no other medium. However I'm convinced that much of it to this day remains untapped. I'd like to explain an idea that I have been bouncing around for a while. It might well be a reformulation of what others have said previously. I believe that implementing this properly would give a nice boost to the blogosphere's social aggregation capability.

Basically the goal is to push the threshold for group creation to an unprecedented low. I think Reed's Law should be refined to state:

The value of a group-forming network increases exponentially with the number of people in the network, and in inverse proportion to the effort required to start a group.

Here's a sample motivating scenario. Not long ago I wrote an item on professions in the blogosphere. The post caught the interest of other bloggers. A few replies came here and there. If you search diligently enough you'll find them, but it's not easy. Presumably, those who have taken part in the discussion would like to hear about it if the topic comes up again, but currently this will only happen by chance. This kind of situation is very common.

[Charles Nadeau: Knowledge management]

Doug Engelbart

<A href="http://radio.weblogs.com/0110772/2002/10/24.html#a500">Doug Engelbart on improving collective IQ</A>.
<P>I don't think I have read as eloquent an explanation of what collaborative intelligence augmentation is and why it matters as <A href="http://www.bootstrap.org/engelbart/index.jsp">Douglas Engelbart</A>'s World Library Summit keynote speech <A href="http://www.fleabyte.org/eic-11.html">Improving our ability to improve: A call for investment in a new future</A>. Here are just a few quotes - but I think it's well worth attentively reading every word of the text. And taking time to think about it.</P>
<BLOCKQUOTE dir=ltr style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
<P><FONT color=darkblue>...the investment in C&nbsp;activities is typically pre-competitive.&nbsp; It is investment that can be shared even among competitors in an industry because it is, essentially, investment in creating a better playing field. [...]</FONT></P>
<P><FONT color=darkblue>At the C level we are trying to understand how improvement really happens, so that we can improve our ability to improve.&nbsp; This means having different groups exploring different paths to the same goal.&nbsp; As they explore, they constantly exchange information about what they are learning.&nbsp; The goal is to maximize overall progress by exchanging important information as the different groups proceed.&nbsp; What this means, in practice, is that the dialog between the people working toward pursuit of the goal is often just as important as the end result of the research.&nbsp; Often, it is what the team learns in the course of the exploration that ultimately opens up breakthrough results. [...]

Continue reading "Doug Engelbart" »

Further Learnings

Have found how to create a standard header and footer. File. Can obviously generate in a more efficient format. Just playing. Really want to develop / ament the table listing, for links to other blogs.

Hmmm, looks like an error. Perhaps I can't use a footer like this with this template?

Well if you went this far back you can see I have learned something. Constant play and prototyping, to move it forward. If you haven't read the book "Serious Play" by Michael Shrage I suggest you do. I beleive it fits with the blogging mentality.


Serious Play

News feed?

Just sent / clips the xml feed into my radio userland blog. Will see if this comes through as news. Checked and it does. Guess I've thus subscribed....

October 25, 2002

Not so straightforward

The problem with prototyping starts when you have no idea what you are doing. Still trying to understand both style sheets CSS and come to grips with the index page. Getting closer. But not there yet.

As a three column style this looks much better than the two colum versions. I like how the type is boxed. Just not the color. Need to also work out picture insertions.

October 28, 2002

Cultivating Communities of Practice

Just received "Cultivating Communites of Practice" by Wenger, McDermott and Snyder. You can also contact them at CPSQUARE and link to the book which has favorable reivew at Amazon.

Look forward to adding my book review notes.

BK Culitvating Communities of Practice

October 29, 2002

The Sixth Sense

No this is not a review on a movie. Still the techniques could well be used on a movie. "The Sixth Sense" the movie may well be about overturning malovent spirits, --- here we are talking of the organizational kind. The kind that leave organizations frozen in their tracks, unable to respond, despite likely intuition to the contrary.

The Sixth Sense Scenarios


I've been waiting to read Kee's new book "The Sixth Sense" for awhile. After his bible on "Scenarios" his new read is a welcome follow-up. Taking us beyond "Scenarios" ( a brilliant practitioners guide), here we have a book with much broader appeal, practical suggestions and examples. While the emphasis is on bringing strategy and organizational development together the real meat is in a subtle conceptual shift.

To accelerate learning, requires Scenarios that inspire a ruthless curiosity about emergent possibilites. In this book practical suggestions for getting the organization involved are presented. No longer can a scenario process be hit with "Who cares? They are only Scenarios!" By creating a learning agenda, scenarios are brought out of the back room and into everyday exchanges. Where they should be.

Thus reframed scenarios are freed to go beyond testing the mental models of managment. The strategic conversation becomes enabling, simulations, conceptual prototyping, adding new creativity and insight. In this way Scenarios become central to creating and leading more adaptive enterprizes into the future. Adoption means -- no more business as usual, and what could be more important in these uncertain times.

If you have an interst in scenarios you should read this book. .

October 30, 2002

First Week

I've been working though MOVEABLE TYPE for a week. It's still not working like I want. The whole process is becoming a little time consuming, and I fear I lack the programming skills.

I've found the support discussion helpful and fast. My real frustration traces to little things, more like gremlins than anything else. Want additional functionality. Subscribe, etc. Have to work each one out. takes time.

Despite the poor documentation for Radio, I'm going to try and load my Radio blog in here. I like the new subscription service. But have no idea how to do that in MT. Similarly Google news.

October 31, 2002

BLOGGING Lifestream

Info pours into my e-mail daily, magazines into my mailbox and there are few other forms of media I am not confronted with. Some of this is useful. Some is thoughtprovoking, and some stimulates new thinking and ideas. Sometimes weeks later, in a meeting I remember facts, require quick points of reference. Often I know roughly when and where it was. Usually I can find it. Still it could be easier. It may have been printed out, downloaded, saved to a file folder --- really who knows. There is so much it is all rather chaotic really.

So why blog? For me the blog looks like a better way of making use of my notes, refering to links and capturing my story. Here's my business lifestream. At least the public parts of it. When David Gelertner published his piece on Lifestreams (checkout Edge too) it made great sense to me. Fundamentally, he says:"A "lifestream" organizes information not as a file cabinet does but roughly as a mind does." Hmmm not sure this is really welcome to my mind. Still the blog is the first opportunity to really start linking my thoughts in a real-time lifestream to a broader "as yet unknown" community.

This is important. For it is often the links you don't know you have that pay the biggest dividends. Some of you may have read my paper on COMsumers. I put it on the back burner. AND YES!!!! I have a couple methods for how decentralized groups of consumers could be motivated to seemlessly accelerate the sharing of profile information. Still that is another story. The point here is Bloggers are sharing aspects of their profiles and information they didn't know they had. The intangibles currently hidden in blogging communities have enormous potential for growth. If you have paid any attention to Napster, Kazaa, eBay or Messaging systems, you may agree with my thoughts on how these communities are learning faster. Participating now... is part of testing my own hypothesis. Nothing like Prototyping to the future.

Back to the basics. I've often observed friends who keep a business diary, noting every meeting and what transpired. Clearly they work chronologically, but fail even when ring bound to capture all the related information, which loose usually falls out and gets lost. With a blog as I link I grow the value of what I capture. With time a story or many stories may emerge. Reflections may later take me back on new and updated journeys.

Let's face it. In the collaborative economy of today it is more important to give information and thoughts away. It cost's me nothing and I may get noticed and generate significant new and unexpected returns. I hope for "generative relationships" that help me grow with those that want to acclerate innovation and strategy development in their organization. I'll be happy to actually receive comments and suggestions. I can't know where to look if I don't know where I should be looking.

Thus my first objective is almost now complete. That was install Moveabletype, set up a basic structure and get it running. The rest can follow

About October 2002

This page contains all entries posted to Unbound Spiral in October 2002. They are listed from oldest to newest.

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