Phweet Quotes – Thanks

August 6, 2008

in Blogging, phweet, tweets

Twitter is changing me. And Phweet is going to change me even more. I’m already shifting my blogging to twitter. I’m starting to think more about how I do it. I’m started putting Twitter out as blog posts although it is not in the feed at the moment. Still a little shy on doing that. Although I doubt that will be true for long.

Businesses are built on what get says early on. It’s just so rewarding to see word of mouth spreading. Right now we are learning and just enjoying the response of those that see it for the first time.

A few more thoughtful blog quotes from the last couple of days. These are really appreciated guys. You are our PR machine! So actually is Twitter. It’s the best mechanism for sharing almost anything new. I expect more and more conversations to bubble up and become Phweets.

@emoltzen
Post Cards, and Now Phone Calls, from Twitter Island –

Now add to it a service like Phweet, which allows users to invite other Twitter users into voice conversations or conference calls. (Twitter users are known as “tweeters” whose comments are “tweets.” Hence “Phweet.”)So how, might you ask, is this different from a chat room or chat line?

Say you’re a technology company executive and you find, through Twitter search, that a number of customers are all complaining about one of your products. You invite them into an impromptu focus group “Phweet,” and quickly pull out of them specifics on what they think went wrong with the product. Or you’re in tech support and you encounter a problem for which there’s no documentation or ready solution; quickly call together a meeting of the minds of other tech professionals via Tweet-Phweet and it might be possible to brainstorm it out – – even at 2 a.m. on a Sunday morning.

@jonhusband
Twitter Conjoined With Instant Calling (TM) = Phweet

Phweet, a service whereby a user with one click can ask someone who has just twittered (or pownced, or jaiku’d, or fed a friend or kwipped) whether or not they will accept a VoIP call. Once accepted, voila ! Connection is established and the voice conversation begins.In terms of how it operates technically, this service effectively eliminates the need for dial-tones (arguably the last remaining communications bottleneck the telcoms “own”) in order to talk to someone else via voice. Powerful stuff !

@mjgraves says Phweet has Real Possibilities:

My impression of the service evolved a little over the course of half an hour actually using it. My initial impression was that it was principally for spawning calls between Twitter users. That’s pretty cool indeed.

But the reality is that it can just as easily create ad hoc conference calls between groups of Twitter users. It’s essentially a new form of virtual MeetUp.

@Twisky makes us a Pinup Star:

Phweet and consumer voice mashups « VoodooLabs’s Weblog

Phweet may really have hit on something in the use of Twitter as the invite and notification medium du jour. They’ve had pretty good traffic in their first week for a service that’s spread through word-of-mouth, and many telephony bloggers have taken notice. And Phweet is truly a voice mashup, combining the Twitter API with TringMe (for the Flash-based VoIP piece) and Televolution’s in order to build something fundamentally new and cool – for consumers.What’s been particularly enjoyable is seeing how conscious the Phweet guys are of how exciting it is to be able to build a service like theirs, and how much credit they give to the existence of the APIs on which they depend. And then there’s this observation from their blog:

Phweet proves both as a reference service and in terms of potential that web/voice/social-media mashups are the future…We believe that Phweet and others can sit at the intersection of the web and telephony.

Couldn’t have said it any better.

@davisbg from TeachEng.Us feels Phweet is Twitter’s Curry and The Next Step for Twitter: Phweet

Today, I found the Twitter’s curry; it is called Phweet. The great thing about it is that it will not matter if it gives you bad breath because you will only be talking to the person via the internet.

Let’s suppose that I want to talk to Jamie about an idea I have for my blog.  I simply go to Phweet and type in Jamie’s username and the message I want to send (for example, “We neet to talk about aTeacheng.us post.”)  Jamie will then see that message on her twitter account and click the link given in the message.  When she does so, my internet browser will whistle, drawing my attention to a button I can click to begin talking. This is awesome because I do not have to worry about downloading any kind of software, so I can use it on my school computer.  Also, it has potential for the classroom, if your students/parents use twitter.  You can conference via the net without adding anyone to your buddylist at other sites.

I see this as being particularly useful for the classroom as a way to be available for students the night before a test.

Happy open voice communication is here, says @Chinarut:

@kencamp, in a post titled Voice and the Web – Blurring the lines between domains says:

Keep in mind this is just the beginning, but I encourage readers to think about where you might find value in shifting conversations from one domain to another. As we look at Communications Enhanced/Enabled Business Processes (CEPB), these are the sorts of tools we’ll see migrating from the open web for fun and experimentation into enterprise business applications of the next generation.Thank you all!

I think it’s something that anyone who uses Twitter and ever has reason to move a conversation over to the telephone will find really useful. Another friend, Chris Brogan, does just that sort of thing regularly. Chris is famous for posting “Call Chris for the next two hours at…” and giving out his cell phone number. With Phweet, Chris can invite specific people, but he cal also easily host an open Phweet conference where the bridge call is established and people can come and go as they please, talking with him via voice while his time is free. I’ve exchanged a couple of messages with Chris and hope to show it to him later today or this evening.

Keep in mind this is just the beginning, but I encourage readers to think about where you might find value in shifting conversations from one domain to another. As we look at Communications Enhanced/Enabled Business Processes (CEPB), these are the sorts of tools we’ll see migrating from the open web for fun and experimentation into enterprise business applications of the next generation.

Thank you all.  We appreciate your support and enthusiasm!

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