links for 2009-11-12

November 12, 2009

in general

  • I don't care how sexy the environment is as a user or a developer, the fact that Apple holds up apps and rejects them often because they compete with their own software is to me like buying a coat made of the skins of endangered species. I won't use iPhone apps for ecological reasons. Permalink to this paragraph

    See also the techcrunch link on why the facebook developer gave up on iPhone. These guys want it to work like the PC environment. And they are so right. Run what you want on it. Better for us and for society.

  • So…. assuming this is all right and deflation is headed our way….

    "that’s because a large part of the “output” is now infinitely reproduceable at no cost. For those who stop thinking of these as “goods that are being copied against our will” and start realizing that they’re “inputs into a wider market where we don’t have to pay for any of the distribution or promotion!” there are much greater opportunities. It’s just that they don’t come from artificial scarcity any more. They come from abundance.”

  • "It took decades to pry computing out of central control and make it personal. We’re in the middle of doing the same with telephony — and everything else we can do on a hand-held device…… Today in the digital world we still have very few personal tools that work only for us, are under personal control, are NEA, and are not provided as a grace of some company or other…. tarting with the social keeps us from working on empowering individuals natively. That most of the social action is in silos and pipes of hot and/or giant companies slows things down even more. They may look impressive now, but they are a drag on the future."

    This post fits perfectly with Jonathan Zitrain's work on Civil Technologies. The issue is actually much deeper than personal or social… the real problem is as we move to mobile we require more personal control and no one company wants to provide it.

  • With twitter we have the same problem as Skype. 70 million accounts is not users. And you cannot infer that there is anywhere close to 12 million users using TweetDeck. However, that TweetDeck users are responsible for 20% of the tweets just from that platform and are probably using tweetie or something similar too… then we know that it is still a very small number of the 70 million accounts that are really active. I also wonder if the US and the UK lead because of SMS support. A few countries better get tweeting given their share of total tweets… they are almost invisible
  • "has shown that gentle text-based nagging can induce people to save more.* As part of a study, they worked with banks in the emerging markets of Bolivia, Peru, and the Philippines. When people opened accounts and encouraged to commit to saving certain amounts, the banks randomly assigned some customers to receive reminders via text. Some notes reminded customers that they had focused on a particular goal, others reminded savers that there were incentives for saving (like higher interest rates), and some did both. The conclusion: "Individuals who received monthly reminders saved 6 percent more than individuals who did not. They were also 3 percent more likely to reach their savings goals by the end of the savings program." The most effective form of messaging was one that reminded people both that they needed to save in order to reach a personal goal and that there were incentives for doing so. Such nudges boosted savings by nearly 16 percent."

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Jon H. November 13, 2009 at 11:27 am

“that’s because a large part of the “output” is now infinitely reproduceable at no cost. For those who stop thinking of these as “goods that are being copied against our will” and start realizing that they’re “inputs into a wider market where we don’t have to pay for any of the distribution or promotion!” there are much greater opportunities. It’s just that they don’t come from artificial scarcity any more. They come from abundance.”

This seems so right, in my opinion. But of course it’s at odds with those high up on the food chain, who would like (and will try with all the fibers of their being) to keep it from encroaching on what they have and see as theirs to control.

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: